What Super Bowl XILX Ads Say About Marketing Trends for 2015

Richard Niño@_Richard_Nino It’s every sports fan's favorite time of the year! No, not the Super Bowl—the Super Bowl commercials!

Normally these commercials are the time to gather around the television and see how your favorite brands have decided to market their product in a unique way, while also inserting a few laughs here and there. This year, however, a majority of the brands decided to do away with their comical, belly-buster commercials and transitioned into darker, more mature content.

For example, Nationwide, who is always on your side, shocked the nation with their Make Safe Happen commercial.

Nationwide wasn’t the only one partaking in more serious content. Nissan made a commercial geared toward fathers that made almost everyone want to pick up the phone and call their dads just to be sure they knew they loved them.

The comical commercials weren’t cutout altogether though. Lindsay Lohan made a surprise appearance in her commercial for Esurance as the “Sorta Mom,” and everyone’s favorite teacher turned meth dealer, Walter White, also made a surprise appearance in an Esurance Commercial as “Sorta Greg.”

The darker tones of the Super Bowl ads were meant to start conversations and garnered discussions all over the internet. While funny commercials are the Super Bowl norm, these darker and harder hitting commercials carried the most punch in their 30-second spans. Will we see a shift to darker commercials throughout the year or did the Super Bowl overdo thought-provoking ads? Upon analyzing the multitude of negative comments that ensued after the commercials aired, it will be interesting to see if these trends will spill over into next year.

Now that everyone’s favorite part of the Super Bowl is over, the planning starts for Super Bowl L (or will we finally be rid of the numerals and just go with Super Bowl 50?). Which ads were your favorite?

Find them all here:

Will Nesbit